how to make homemade candles

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If you are looking to make candles, for holiday gifts or just as a fun craft project, there are a few things you may want to know.

These tips are for candle making that is recreational and not for profit. In order to make a profit in candle making you need professional equipment and supplies. You cannot make candles fast enough or cheap enough without bulk ordering and producing.

That being said, a good way to get supplies crafting is from a local craft store. You can buy wax in two-pound or 10-pound slabs depending on how many candles you want to make, and how big you want them to be.

The craft store will also have an array of different wick sizes to choose from. I recommend getting the wicks with the metal base. They are much easier to work with than a spooled wick. If you are not sure how tall your candles will be, buy the tallest wicks. It is better to be longer than shorter. You can always cut down the wick after the candle cools.

You can also buy scents, dyes, and a wax melting pot made specifically for candles from a craft store. However, there are much cheaper alternatives available.

For scents you can, instead, buy wax melts, sometimes called tarts. They will also be at the craft store. They are small super scented blocks of wax that are supposed to be melted over a tea light candle to scent a room.

An alternative to dye blocks is to use wax crayons. You can buy them at the craft store if you want, but you can probably get a box of 64 at the nearest dollar store.

You are going to want to buy a container to melt your wax in. There are plenty of options here. You can buy the aluminum melting pot from the craft store or if you have an old ceramic or glass pot that will work fine too. Another option is to use a glass measuring cup.

The last thing that you need to figure out is what type of container you want to use. Again, the dollar store can come in quite handy. Of course, the cheapest method is to use old coffee cups or cleaned out old candle containers. The craft store will have votive candleholders; most of them will work just fine as candle containers.

Once you have all your supplies at home, it is time to get started. You want to melt your wax in a double boiler situation, so find a pot that will hold you melter. Put the melter in the pot and fill the pot with water. Remember to leave room for the water to bubble without spilling over. Turn the burner on high.

You are going to need something to stir your wax with. A butter knife will do the trick just fine.

Once the water is boiling, you want to put your crayon in first. The crayon will mix together with your wax much better if you melt it first and then add your candle wax.

While your crayon is melting try to figure out about how much wax you think you are going to need for you candle or candles. Now add at least 10 percent more. As you candle cools the wax will shrink and cause a divot, or dip, in the top of your candle. This is inevitable.

Add your wax to your melted crayon and let it melt completely. Stir occasionally to avoid burning the bottom. Don’t forget to place your wicks in the center of your candleholders.

The very last thing that you do before pouring your wax is to add the scent. You want the scent to say cool for as long as possible. The longer it is hot the less scent it holds.

Pour you candles stopping a quarter-inch to a half-inch from the top. Allow the candles to cool completely. This part takes patience and can be very hard. You can speed up the process by letting the candles sit out for one hour and then putting them in the refrigerator for another two to three hours.

Once your candles are completely cooled you should reheat your left over wax and fill in the dent in the top of your candle. Once this wax cools, cut your wick to a quarter-inch and enjoy!